Statistical Stuff for 2010

Huzzah!  It’s time again for the DTs Correlation Does Not Equal Causation Festival!

In 2010, DTs ran a total call volume:  775 calls, of which 379 were deemed BLS, 360 were ALS, and 17 were CCT (the CCT numbers should increase in 2011, for DTs is now running such calls since mid-December 2010.)  A mere 31 calls were “lights & sirens” at the request of the sending facility.  We were placed in service prior to patient contact on 35 occasions.  Average number of calls per day, around 7, with a maximum during a single calendar day of 12.  Note that a shift spans two calendar days (eg 06am 12/1 to 06am 12/2) so the actual numbers are probably higher, but I’m too lazy to figure that one out this time.

DTs and his Merry Crew ran 369 male, and 406 female patients.  This is typical; guys don’t tend to go to hospital as often, and the ladies are still living longer.

The average age of all patients was 54 years, with a minimum age of 1 hour (actually probably less than an hour, but my tracking software goes all the way down to “1″) and our oldest patient was 102 years.

Total patient weight – welcome to America – was 42,281kg (or 93,018lbs, or 46.51 tons o’ patient.)  Total weight of all males was 28,165kg making the average male weight 76.32 kg, while the average female patient weighed 66.9kg.

Of our patients who spoke NO English whatsoever, 27 spoke only Spanish; 4 spoke Arabic, 4 Farsi, 3 Korean, 3 French, 2 Urdu/Hindi, and 2 Vietnamese, and one… Greek.  Did not see that coming.

As usual, Chest Pain leads the chief-complaint pack by 2:1 over the next most common complaint, abdominal pain.  The breakdown is:

Chest pain 74
Abd pain 36
AMS 25
Pneumonia 25
Dyspnea 23
Suicidal ideation 21
CVA 20
Dr appointment 16
Appendicitis 14
CHF 14
Fever 11
UTI 11
Fall 10
Atrial fibrillation 9
Malaise 9
Respiratory failure 9
Seizures 9
Backache 8
Premature birth 8
Psychosis 8
Syncope 8
Bleed – GI 7
COPD 7
Injury – head 7
Overdose, suicidal 7
Pancreatitis 7
Asthma 6
Bleed – intracranial 6
Cellulitis 6
FX – hip 6
Hypotension 6
Pulmonary embolism 6
Respiratory abnormality 6
Small bowel obstruction 6
(empty) 5
Dehydration 5
TIA 5
Vomiting 5
Epistaxis 4
Gastroenteritis 4
Hematuria 4
Renal failure 4
Respiratory distress 4
Sepsis 4
Subdural hematoma 4
Abnormal labs 3
AMI 3
Bleed – head 3
Burn 3
Cardiac catheterization 3
Cholecystitis 3
Contusion 3
Croup 3
Depression 3
DKA 3
G-tube replacement 3
Headache 3
Hyperkalemia 3
Hypertension 3
Kidney stones 3
Mass – chest 3
MVA 3
Pain – leg 3
Pain – limb 3
Post-surgery 3
Pyelonephritis 3
Renal insufficiency 3
Tachycardia 3
Weakness 3
Abscess 2
Amputation 2
Anemia 2
Bleed – rectal 2
Bleed – vaginal 2
Bradycardia 2
Bronchiolitis 2
CAD 2
Cardiac dysrhythmia 2
Cath replacement 2
Cerebral palsy 2
Colitis 2
Complications – trach 2
Constipation 2
Dementia 2
Diverticulitis 2
Fatigue 2
FX – ankle 2
FX – arm 2
FX – femur 2
FX – foot 2
Hernia 2
Injury – ankle 2
Injury – face 2
Laceration – lip 2
Leukemia 2
Necrotizing fasciitis 2
Overdose, accidental 2
Pacemaker malfunction 2
Paresthesia 2
Pulmonary insufficiency 2
Stridor 2
Suicidal attempt (non-OD) 2
Surgical consult 2
Tumor, brain 2
Ulcer, skin 2
Vertigo 2

In the transport gig patient pickup is usually from a facility, rather than from residence or roadside. 240 patients were picked up at a single standalone ED, with 176, 106, and 104 patients taken from the big three area hospitals.

As to where they’re taken, 116 went to a general hospital, 110 to a level 1 trauma center, and 73 to a specialty rehab facility. The rest are sprinkled into nursing homes, specialty hospitals (eg Childrens Hospital, or the MedStar Burn Unit), and 45 to residences.

Analysis skills, not so much

Something was nagging me all day yesterday about the recent post with the 2009 stats. “DTs,” said I to myself, “You are slothful, it is true. Yet there is no way that twenty-four shifts of yesteryear went by with one call each, nor 42 shifts with only two calls each. Not to mention those shifts where our gluteus maximi were giftwrapped and given us by dispatch. You are a poor statistician and must be punished.”

DTs partner looked stonily ahead. There was no way he was being drawn into this discussion.

It occurred to me that the problem was: Our shifts run from 06:00 to 06:00. Therefore, a scant 18 hours into my shift, it is midnight – lo, a new day dawns. And the spreadsheet clicked over as well. On 24 occasions, we ran a single call after midnight, and then nothing afterward. Thus are mighty statistics humbled.

A quick formula change – “if the dates are the same, fine, keep counting, but if they change, check to see if it’s before 06:00; if it is, same shift” – results in the following, more lifelike volume statistics:


Calls per Shift Number of Shifts this Occurred
3 2
4 5
5 5
6 10
7 19
8 17
9 11
10 13
11 8
12 5
13 1
15 2
17 1

Statistically, you’ll note that this table supports the distribution one would expect for an average call volume of 7.85 calls – 817 divided by 104 shift-days.  Sorry for the confusion.

Call Statistics for 2009

So, here we are – call volume for 2009 (DTs and his merry crew only, not corporate- or station-wide.)  Note that we work about 2 days a week – 104 days a year.  817 calls therefore represents an average call volume of 7.85 calls/shift.

The actual distribution is as follows:

Call Volume Distribution
Calls per Day Occurrences
1 24
2 42
3 21
4 12
5 18
6 23
7 16
8 12
9 11
10 4
11 1
12 1

Call Volume
Total times toned out 817
ALS 432
BLS 341
CCT 9
NICU 23
PICU 12
Placed In Service 65
Lights and Sirens per MD 29

The demographics also includes information for patients who refused transport, or for patients where the information is known but we were placed in service.

Demographics
Male 390
Female 425
Average Age 53.29 years
Min Age 1 hour
Max Age 102 years
Min Weight 0 kg
Max Weight 270 kg

Total weight lifted by DTs and his groaning compatriots:  56,583 kg  ( 124,483 pounds).  Yikes.


As usual, if the patient speaks English they are not counted here; this is strictly monolingual patients. Dahri and Pashtun are combined into “Farsi”; a distinction is made between Urdu and Hindi, of course.  Spanish is Spanish – no distinction is made between the various dialects.

Patient Language
Spanish 22
Farsi 6
Korean 5
Urdu or Hindi 3
French 2
Amharic 1
Arabic 1
Chinese 1
Russian 1

Chief complaints sorted by count, then alphabetically. As usual, chest pains dominate the call volume.

Chief Compaints
CC F M Total Result
Total Result 425 389 817
Chest pain 47 41 88
Pneumonia 12 18 30
Abd pain 16 9 25
Dyspnea 9 13 22
AMS 10 11 21
Appendicitis 8 12 20
Suicidal ideation 14 6 20
CVA 12 6 18
Premature birth 10 7 17
Syncope 8 8 16
CHF 6 7 13
Fever 7 6 13
AMI 1 11 12
Atrial fibrillation 7 5 12
Fall 7 5 12
Seizures 5 7 12
UTI 7 5 12
Cellulitis 5 6 11
FX – hip 6 4 10
Anemia 7 2 9
Pancreatitis 6 3 9
Psychosis 2 6 9
Asthma 3 5 8
Overdose, suicidal 7 1 8
Routine checkup 5 3 8
Small bowel obstruction 5 3 8
FX – femur 4 3 7
Renal failure 2 5 7
Respiratory distress 1 6 7
G-tube replacement 3 3 6
Sepsis 3 3 6
Subdural hematoma 3 3 6
Vomiting 5 1 6
Bleed – GI 1 4 5
Cholecystitis 3 2 5
DKA 5 5
FX – ankle 5 5
FX – spine 4 1 5
Hypoglycemia 3 2 5
Injury – head 4 1 5
Atrial flutter 4 4
Backache 2 2 4
Bleed – head 4 4
COPD 3 1 4
Failure to thrive 3 1 4
FX – rib 3 1 4
Hypotension 1 3 4
Laceration – head 2 2 4
Meningitis 1 3 4
Overdose, accidental 1 3 4
Pneumothorax 2 2 4
Pulmonary embolism 4 4
TIA 4 4
Weakness 2 2 4
Allergic reaction 1 2 3
Bipolar 3 3
Bleed – intracranial 2 1 3
Bronchitis 2 1 3
Cath replacement 3 3
Dehydration 1 2 3
Gastroenteritis 1 2 3
Head trauma 2 1 3
Hematuria 3 3
Hyperkalemia 2 1 3
Hypertension 1 2 3
Injury – hip 2 1 3
Joint pain 1 2 3
Kidney stones 1 2 3
Pylonephritis 3 3
Schizophrenia 1 2 3
Airway obstruction 2 2
Bleed – vaginal 2 2
Bradycardia 1 1 2
Bronchospasm 1 1 2
Burn 2 2
Complications – surgical 2 2
Depression 2 2
Detox 1 1 2
Dislocation, shoulder 2 2
Dizziness 1 1 2
Ectopic pregnancy 2 2
Encephalopathy 1 1 2
FX – skull 2 2
Gangrene 2 2
Headache 1 1 2
Hyponatremia 1 1 2
Infection 2 2
Injury – face 1 1 2
Injury – spine 1 1 2
Laceration 1 1 2
Nausea 1 1 2
Pain – hip 2 2
Palpitations 2 2
Poisoning 1 1 2
Sciatica 2 2
Spinal stenosis 1 1 2
Swelling 2 2
Tachycardia 1 1 2
Thrombocytopenia 2 2
Tumor, brain 1 1 2
Ulcer 2 2
Urinary retention 2 2
Wheezing 1 1 2
Wound care 1 1 2
Abd pain – traumatic 1 1
Abdominal mass 1 1
Abscess 1 1
Abscess – peritonsilar 1 1
Abscess – rectal 1 1
ACS 1 1
Acute coronary syndrome 1 1
Alzheimers 1 1
Amputation 1 1
Amputation – bka 1 1
Aneurism 1 1
Angioedema 1 1
Arrhythmia 1 1
Bacteremia 1 1
Bleed – rectal 1 1
Bleed – subarachnoid 1 1
Blurred vision 1 1
Bowel necrosis 1 1
Bowel obstruction 1 1
CA – pancreatic 1 1
CAD 1 1
Cancer 1 1
Cardiomyopathy 1 1
Central cord syndrome 1 1
Colitis 1 1
Complications, shunt 1 1
Confusion 1 1
Contusion 1 1
Convulsions 1 1
Cough 1 1
Dementia 1
Diabetes, new onset 1 1
Diarrhea 1 1
Diplopia 1 1
Dysphagia 1 1
Dysrhythmia 1 1
Epistaxis 1 1
Esophageal atresia 1 1
Eye – ruptured globe 1 1
Fatigue 1 1
Flu 1 1
Foley replacement 1 1
FX – arm 1 1
FX – compression 1 1
FX – foot 1 1
FX – humerus 1 1
FX – jaw 1 1
FX – tib/fib 1 1
Gallstones 1 1
Gastritis 1 1
Gout 1 1
Guillain-Barre syndrome 1 1
Hallucinations 1 1
Hemoptysis 1 1
Hepatic mass 1 1
Hernia 1 1
Hypertensive crisis 1 1
Hypokalemia 1 1
Hypomagnesemia 1 1
Hypoxemia 1 1
Infection – foot 1 1
Injury – ankle 1 1
Injury – arm 1 1
Injury – eye 1 1
Injury – toe 1 1
Knee surgery 1 1
Labor 1 1
Laceration – arm 1 1
Laceration – scalp 1 1
Laceration – spleen 1 1
Leg injury 1 1
Leg pain 1 1
Leukocytosis 1 1
Liver failure 1 1
Lymphoma 1 1
Malaise 1 1
Mastoiditis 1 1
Migraine 1 1
Multiple sclerosis 1 1
Muscle spasms 1 1
Myelopathy 1 1
Neck pain 1 1
Neutropenia 1 1
Osteoarthritis 1 1
Ovarian cyst 1 1
Overdose, suici 1 1
Pacemaker insertion 1 1
Pain – arm 1 1
Pain – limb 1 1
Pain – throat 1 1
Pelvic mass 1 1
Pericardial effusion 1 1
Pericarditis 1 1
Peritonitis 1 1
Pharyngitis 1 1
Plasmapheresis 1 1
Post sleep study 1 1
Post-surgery 1 1
Pregnancy 1 1
Prostatitis 1 1
Pulmonary hypertension 1 1
Pulmonary insufficiency 1 1
Renal insufficiency 1 1
Respiratory abnormality 1 1
Respiratory failure 1 1
RSV 1 1
Shoulder pain 1 1
Sickle cell crisis 1 1
Stabbing 1 1
STEMI 1 1
Subarachnoid hemmhorage 1 1
Suicidal attempt (non-OD) 1 1
Surgical consult 1 1
TBI 1 1
Transcerebral ischemia 1 1
Unstable angina 1 1
Urosepsis 1 1
Volvulus 1 1
VTach 1 1

My Spreadsheets Kick A$$

…it says so here on my little pencil holder on my desk.

2008 – A Year In The Transport Gig, Reduced to Numbers

Call Class Count
ALS 450
BLS 296
CCT 13
NICU 6
PICU 7
Sex Count Youngest Oldest Avg Age
M 378 1 Day 98 Years 56.67 Yrs
F 394 1 Day 101 Years 57.76 Yrs
Response Type Count
Emergent 45
En Route 727

Some of these chief complaints are redundant, or may overlap. For instance, “Bleed – brain” and “Subdural hematoma” may mean the same thing; or they may not. Rather than second-guess why it is the doc described just-so, I enter them as they come across from Dispatch.

CC Total
Abd aortic aneurism 2
Abd pain 20
Abnormal labs 1
Abscess 1
ACS 1
Airway obstruction 1
AMI 18
Amputation 1
Amputation – finger 1
AMS 18
Anemia 3
Aneurism 1
Angina, Ludwigs 1
Anorexia 1
Anxiety 1
Aortic stenosis 1
Appendicitis 12
Arrhythmia 2
Asthma 6
Atrial fibrillation 10
Atrial flutter 1
Backache 4
Biliary colic 1
Bleed – brain 2
Bleed – femoral 1
Bleed – GI 11
Bleed – intracranial 1
Bleed – post-cath 1
Bleed – rectal 2
Bleed – retroperitoneal 1
Bleed – subarachnoid 4
Bleed – subdural 1
Bleed – vaginal 2
Bowel obstruction 2
Bradycardia 1
Bronchiolitis 1
Burn 3
CA – brain 1
CA – colon 1
CA – esophageal 1
CA – lung 1
CA – ovarian 1
CABG 1
CAD 1
Cancer 2
Cardiac arrest 1
Cardiac defect 2
Cardiac dysrhythmia 1
Cardiomyopathy 1
Cath replacement 1
Cellulitis 8
Cerebral mass 1
Chest pain 96
Chest trauma 1
CHF 20
Choking 2
Cholecystitis 5
Cholelithiasis 1
Clogged cath 1
Colitis 1
Complications – surgical 4
Complications of birth 1
Confusion 1
Convulsions 4
COPD 5
CVA 19
CVA/Stroke 2
Decubitus ulcer 1
Dehydration 3
Dementia 1
Depression 1
Detox 1
Diarrhea 3
Dislocation, knee 1
Diverticulitis 1
Dizziness 6
DJD 1
DKA 4
Dyspnea 27
Eating disorder 1
Ectopic pregnancy 1
Edema 3
Encephalopathy 2
Endocarditis 1
Endometritis 1
Epidural abscess 1
Epigastric pain 1
Epiglotitis 1
Epistaxis 2
Esophageal blockage 1
Esophageal tear 1
Fall 18
Fever 17
Fistula 1
Flu 2
FX – ankle 1
FX – arm 1
FX – C2 1
FX – C5 1
FX – compression 1
FX – elbow 1
FX – face 2
FX – femur 10
FX – fibula 1
FX – hip 8
FX – humerus 2
FX – L4 1
FX – patella 1
FX – pelvic 5
FX – rib 2
Fx – shoulder 1
FX – skull 2
FX – spine 3
FX – supra-chondylar 1
FX – tib/fib 2
FX – tibia 1
FX – wrist 1
FX – wrist; FX – elbow 1
Gallstones 4
Gastroenteritis 1
Gastroparesis 1
Generalized pain 1
G-tube replacement 7
Head trauma 2
Headache 1
Heart block 1
Heart block – 2° 1
Hematuria 4
Hepatitis 1
Hernia 1
Hip dislocation 1
Hip injury 1
Hip replacement 1
Homicidal ideation 1
Hydronephrosis 2
Hypercalcemia 1
Hyperglycemia 2
Hypertension 2
Hypoglycemia 3
Hypokalemia 3
Hyponatremia 2
Hypotension 2
Hypothermia 1
Hypoxia 2
Ileus 1
Injury – hand 1
Injury – hip 1
Intracerebral hemhorrage 2
Intractable pain 1
Joint pain 3
Kidney stones 1
Knee pain 1
Knee surgery 3
Labor 1
Laceration – liver 1
Laceration – spleen 1
Laceration – vaginal 1
Leg injury 2
Leg pain 3
Leg surgery 1
Liver failure 1
Lymphedema 1
Lymphoma 1
Malaise 2
Malaria 1
Mastoiditis 1
Metabolic acidosis 1
Multiple injuries MVC 1
Multi-system trauma 2
MVA 1
Myasthenia gravis 1
Necrosis 1
Numbness 2
Overdose, accidental 2
Pacemaker insertion 1
Pancreatitis 8
Pancytopenia 1
Parotiditis 1
Penetrating eye inj 1
PET scan 1
Pneumonia 22
Pneumonia, aspiration 2
Pneumothorax 5
Post-surgery 3
Premature birth 1
Psychosis 2
Pulmonary congestion 1
Pulmonary edema 3
Pulmonary embolism 5
Pulmonary insufficiency 3
Pulmonary stenosis 1
Pylonephritis 4
R/O ectopic preg 1
R/O TB 1
Radiation treatment 3
Renal colic 1
Renal failure 7
Renal insufficiency 1
Respiratory distress 6
Respiratory failure 1
Scabies 1
Schizophrenia 1
Seizures 10
Sepsis 9
Sickle cell crisis 1
Small bowel obstruction 7
Spinal injury 1
Spontaneous abortion 1
Stroke 3
Subdural hematoma 3
Suicidal attempt (non-OD) 2
Suicidal ideation 12
Suicidal overdose 7
SVT 1
Swallowed coin 1
Syncope 12
Tachycardia 2
TBI 1
Tenosynovitis 1
Testicular pain 1
Testicular torsion 1
Tetralogy of Fallot 1
Thrombocythelia 1
Thrombocytopenia 1
TIA 2
Trach replacement 1
Traumatic injury 3
Ulcer 1
Unstable angina 1
Urinary retention 1
UTI 6
Vertigo 1
Vomiting 4
VTach 2
Weakness 7
Wound care 2

I try to be able to communicate with my patients, at least to the extent of asking about allergies, medications, PMH, and all that jazz. If a patient speaks any English, they are not counted here. If a family member who speaks English is available at bedside or accompanies the patient, they are not listed here. These are therefore the patients whose sole means of communication is via their language only.

Language
Amharic 1
Farsi 4
Chinese 1
French 2
German 1
Korean 2
ASL 1
Urdu 3
Spanish 26
Russian 1
Somali 1
Thai 1
Tigrit 1
Vietnamese 4

MedMath: Dopamine Trick

(Note: Originally posted with a typo, “800 mg” instead of the correct “400 mg” – but now corrected!  Thanks everybody!)

Last week DTs began to brush up on med math, in preparation of precepting a rising medic with Major Transport Company.

“Brush up on medmath, DTs?” you say. “Shouldn’t you know this stuff?”

Well, yes. But as any medic will tell you, med math is one of those facets of EMS where everyone has their own method. My preceptee-to-be has already expressed an interest in learning more in this fascinating area.

So I was re-familiarizing meself with all the available methods, e.g. Ratio and Proportion method, Formula method, Cross-multiplication, Three-Step, Rule-of-Fours, and so-on, when I came to Dopamine, and the Neat Thing.

Dopamine: the bugaboo of 2-am drips. Here is a sample word problem: You have a patient who weighs 220 lbs, and the doctor orders you to start a 5 mcg/kg/min dopamine drip. You have 400mg dopamine and a 250ml bag of D5w. What is the drip rate?

Lessee here, this guy weighs 220lbs, which times 2.2 is 100kg, and we need 5 mikes/kg so that’s 100 kg * 5 is 500 micrograms per minute, and there’s 400 milligrams of medicine in 250 milliliters of D5w so that makes 1600 micrograms per milliliter…

At 2am medics have been known to run screaming into the night.

Now, dopamine is especially atrocious because different dosages seem to have different properties. For instance, 2mcg/kg/min is a “renal” dose, appropriate for maintaining renal function, while 5mcg/kg/min is considered an inotropic or “cardiac” dose, and 15+mcg/kg/min is the alpha agonist or “vasopressor” dosage, useful for maintaining blood pressure. So, yeah, somebody somewhere is at some point gonna make the medic start a dopamine drip.

So here’s the Neat Thing:

In all this reading, and now of course I can’t find exactly where, but props to the Brady company and Dr. Bryan Bledsoe – I’m pretty sure it was in one of their Tomes – DTs came across something called the Colorado Down and Dirty Dopamine Ditty. At least, I think that’s what it was called.

Easy-peasy dopamine calculation for when you want the cardiac dose of 5mcg/kg/min: When your concentration is 1600 micrograms/milliliter, take the patient’s weight IN POUNDS, divide by 10, and subtract 2. That’s your drip in milliliters per hour.

(220 POUNDS / 10) = 22, subtract 2 = 20 milliliters/hour.

As long, that is, as you want the 5 mcg/kg/min rate.

Now, as the “down and dirty” implies, this is not exactly right. For instance, a patient weighting 160 pounds gets, by the Colorado method, (160/10)-2 = 14 ml/hour. The actual calculation, where (milliliters per hour) = (weight kg) * (dose mcg/kg/min) * (60 min/hour) / (concentration mcg/ml)

(deep breath)

would be ((160/2.2) * 5 * 60)/1600, or (72.73 * 300)/1600, or 13.64 ml/hr. The Colorado method is therefore 0.36 ml/hr off! This is a 2.67% error! BFD. At 2 am, this is great.

But

The DTs Cheat is even easier, and has a more consistant error rate.

The DTs Cheat: Weight (kilograms) / 5.

Done.

A 220 lb patient is (as we all know from endless classes) the Perfect Weight Drug Patient (not so much for lifting). 220 lb = 100 kg.

100 kg / 5 = 20 ml/hr.

“DTs, this is all fine,” you say, gently, “But you do realize that your simplistic, and simple-minded method, may not always apply? I mean, come on, it works for a 100 kg patient, but…”

That’s what I thought, too, so I built a model (simple spreadsheet did for it) and ran the formulas head-to-head from a 50 lb patient through a 380 lb patient. At 50 lbs, the Colorado method was 29.6% off; the DTs method was 6.67%; at 380 lbs, Colorado was 11.16% while DTs was 6.67%.

Weight lbs Weight kg
(lbs / 2.2)
Dopamine
Dose
5mcg/kg
Pump
ml/hr = (kg*dose*60)

/1600

Colorado
( lbs / 10) – 2
Error Error % DTS

Cheat
(kgs/ 5)

Error Error %
50 22.73 113.64 4.26 3 1.26 29.60% 4.5 0.28 6.67%
60 27.27 136.36 5.11 4 1.11 21.78% 5.5 0.34 6.67%
70 31.82 159.09 5.97 5 0.97 16.19% 6.4 0.40 6.67%
80 36.36 181.82 6.82 6 0.82 12.00% 7.3 0.45 6.67%
90 40.91 204.55 7.67 7 0.67 8.74% 8.2 0.51 6.67%
100 45.45 227.27 8.52 8 0.52 6.13% 9.1 0.57 6.67%
110 50.00     250.00 9.38 9 0.37 4.00%      10.0 0.63 6.67%
120 54.55 272.73 10.23 10 0.23 2.22% 10.9 0.68 6.67%
130 59.09 295.45 11.08 11 0.08 0.72% 11.8 0.74 6.67%
140 63.64 318.18 11.93 12 0.07 0.57% 12.7 0.80 6.67%
150 68.18 340.91 12.78 13 0.22 1.69% 13.6 0.85 6.67%
160 72.73 363.64 13.64 14 0.36 2.67% 14.5 0.91 6.67%
170 77.27 386.36 14.49 15 0.51 3.53% 15.5 0.97 6.67%
180 81.82 409.09 15.34 16 0.66 4.30% 16.4 1.02 6.67%
190 86.36 431.82 16.19 17 0.81 4.98% 17.3 1.08 6.67%
200 90.91 454.55 17.05 18 0.95 5.60% 18.2 1.14 6.67%
210 95.45 477.27 17.90 19 1.10 6.16% 19.1 1.19 6.67%
220 100.00     500.00              18.75 20      1.25 6.67%      20.0      1.25 6.67%
230 104.55 522.73 19.60 21 1.40 7.13% 20.9 1.31 6.67%
240 109.09 545.45 20.45 22 1.55 7.56% 21.8 1.36 6.67%
250 113.64 568.18 21.31 23 1.69 7.95% 22.7 1.42 6.67%
260 118.18 590.91 22.16 24 1.84 8.31% 23.6 1.48 6.67%
270 122.73 613.64 23.01 25 1.99 8.64% 24.5 1.53 6.67%
280 127.27 636.36 23.86 26 2.14 8.95% 25.5 1.59 6.67%
290 131.82 659.09 24.72 27 2.28 9.24% 26.4 1.65 6.67%
300 136.36 681.82 25.57 28 2.43 9.51% 27.3 1.70 6.67%
310 140.91 704.55 26.42 29 2.58 9.76% 28.2 1.76 6.67%
320 145.45 727.27 27.27 30 2.73 10.00% 29.1 1.82 6.67%
330 150.00 750.00 28.13 31 2.88 10.22% 30.0 1.88 6.67%
340 154.55 772.73 28.98 32 3.02 10.43% 30.9 1.93 6.67%
350 159.09 795.45 29.83 33 3.17 10.63% 31.8 1.99 6.67%
360 163.64 818.18 30.68 34 3.32 10.81% 32.7 2.05 6.67%
370 168.18 840.91 31.53 35 3.47 10.99% 33.6 2.10 6.67%
380 172.73 863.64 32.39 36 3.61 11.16% 34.5 2.16 6.67%

So anyway, there’s that for what it’s worth. 400mg of dopamine in 250ml D5w, kgs/5, set your drip.

Of course, if you have a pump, by all means do it the long way – makes it much easier to modify during transport.

And, if anyone can figure out a neat little math trick to get rid of that constant 6.67% (I am certain there must be one!) please let me know, as that would be very cool indeed.

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